A bit more about WWI

Ever since I wrote this post about World War I and the knitting associated with it, I have seen several other articles pop up around the internet about this topic and I thought I'd share.

This one from Australia is interesting in that it discusses the wool issues, covers the First World War through the Korean War, and has some great photos.

This one from Washington State is long but includes some great details about what sorts of things were knit during the war, like "wool helmets and vests, chest covers and fingerless mitts to allow trigger access." Socks (of course), sweaters and "mufflers" were also in demand. Everyone was knitting, expected to knit and discouraged from knitting for personal use. This article really gives you a sense of the pervasiveness of the wartime knitting and the urgency felt by knitters around the world who were asked to knit for the boys in the trenches.

 Popular at the time was the notion of not wasting precious time that could be spent knitting.  This "bag of the hour" was both useful and "smart."  Also, note its air distingue [sic].  Très adorable!

Popular at the time was the notion of not wasting precious time that could be spent knitting.  This "bag of the hour" was both useful and "smart."  Also, note its air distingue [sic].  Très adorable!

 

I also discovered that there is a National WWI Museum here in the U.S.  As of this time they don't seem to have a knitting program like the National WWII Museum has, it still looks as though it has many interesting programs and exhibits. The next time you're in Kansas City, MO, check it out--and of course I'm going to want to hear all about it!

Some folks in England are filming a movie about WWI, and some knitters have banded together to knit costumes based on old patterns and recreations from old photos. Be careful following these links if you love history and knitting--I am still wiping the drool off my keyboard.

I will leave you with a Monday Medley of Patterns--all free. Holly Shaltz has a great website with patterns from the era, reinterpreted for modern knitters.  There's even a pattern for socks

You probably figured out that I'm fascinated by all this, so if you see anything else related to WWI out there that you think I might like, especially in commemoration of the 100th anniversary, let me know!